Flexible Connectors in Medical Gases

Medical gas equipment can be complex and varied in nature.

And the difficulty in accurately interpreting NFPA codes can add to the complexity.

Flexible connectors are a good example.

Critical to the safe operation of flexible connectors within booms and articulating assemblies is continued testing and maintenance. Damaged hoses and leaks can result in secondary equipment damage and potential fire risk.

Therefore, NFPA 99 requires all non-stationary booms and articulating assemblies to be tested for leaks every 18 months or as determined by a risk assessment. This requirement applies to hoses in both new and existing construction.

equipment can be complex and varied in nature. And difficulty in accurately interpreting NFPA codes can add to the complexity. Flexible connectors are a good example.

They can refer to the metallic connectors on central supply sources to mitigate machine vibration. Flexible connectors can also refer to non-metallic hoses that interconnect secondary and clinical equipment to wall inlets and outlets. They may be present in headwalls, manufactured assemblies, or simple drops from ceiling inlets and outlets. These types of hoses can be constructed of different materials, but all should be periodically inspected by the hospital staff to ensure they are not kinked or damaged. Of particular concern arehoses in surgical areas, as they can get bent, stepped on, and pinched by equipment.

Continue reading about flexible connector inspection, maintenance, and testing in our blog post: Flexible Connector Considerations in Booms and Articulating Assemblies.

👋 If you need assistance in evaluating your medical gas system, call AISHMED  today itself.

Similar Posts

One Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.